Why It's So Hard For Robots To Get A Grip | Rickey J. White, Jr. | RJW™
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Why It's So Hard For Robots To Get A Grip

Why It's So Hard For Robots To Get A Grip

Robots are all thumbs. Engineers are working to improve dexterity so bots can take over housekeeping drudgework—as well as people’s jobs.

Robots are all thumbs. Engineers are working to improve dexterity so bots can take over housekeeping drudgework—as well as people’s jobs.

Berkeley robotics professor Ken Goldberg is turning an empty coffee mug around and around in his hands. “Oh, it’s so complicated for a robot to be able to make sense of that kind of data,” he says, eyeing his fingers grasping the cup with a look of wonder. Artificial intelligence is taking on complex cognitive tasks, such as assisting in legal and medical research, but a manual job like picking up laundry off the floor is still science fiction. It’s a long way from Roomba to Rosie the Robot. Universities like Berkeley and Cornell and companies like Amazon and Toyota are working to close the gap with mechanical hands that approach human dexterity.

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Source: Fast Company

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